451 Total Quotes

William Hazlitt Quotes Page 5

William Hazlitt
The mind of man is like a clock that is always running down, and requires constantly to be wound up
William Hazlitt
#Man

William Hazlitt
To give a reason for anything is to breed a doubt of it
William Hazlitt
#Doubt

William Hazlitt
No young man believes he shall ever die
William Hazlitt
#Death

William Hazlitt
The dupe of friendship, and the fool of love; have I not reason to hate and to despise myself? Indeed I do; and chiefly for not having hated and despised the world enough.
William Hazlitt
#Fools And Foolishness

William Hazlitt
The silence of a friend commonly amounts to treachery. His not daring to say anything in our behalf implies a tacit censure.
William Hazlitt
#Silence

William Hazlitt
A hair in the head is worth two in the brush.
William Hazlitt
#English Critic #Worth

William Hazlitt
If we wish to know the force of human genius, we should read Shakespeare. If we wish to see the insignificance of human learning, we may study his commentators.
William Hazlitt
#English Critic #Force

William Hazlitt
An accomplished coquette excites the passions of others, in proportion as she feels none herself
William Hazlitt
#Passion

William Hazlitt
The world judge of men by their ability in their professions, and we judge of ourselves by the same test; for it is on that on which our success in life depends
William Hazlitt
#Ability

William Hazlitt
Envy among other ingredients has a mixture of the love of justice in it. We are more angry at undeserved than at deserved good-fortune.
William Hazlitt
#English Critic #Envy

William Hazlitt
Wit is the rarest quality to be met with among people of education, and the most common among the uneducated.
William Hazlitt
#Education

William Hazlitt
Poetry is the universal language which the heart holds with nature and itself. He who has a contempt for poetry, cannot have much respect for himself, or for anything else.
William Hazlitt
#English Critic #Contempt

William Hazlitt
The love of fame is almost another name for the love of excellence; or it is the ambition to attain the highest excellence, sanctioned by the highest authority, that of time.
William Hazlitt
#Love #Fame

William Hazlitt
Prejudice is never easy unless it can pass itself off for reason
William Hazlitt
#Reason

William Hazlitt
There is a heroism in crime as well as in virtue. Vice and infamy have their altars and their religion.
William Hazlitt
#English Critic

William Hazlitt
Man is an individual animal with narrow faculties, but infinite desires, which he is anxious to concentrate in some one object within the grasp of his imagination, and where, if he cannot be all that he wishes himself, he may at least contemplate his own pride, vanity, and passions, displayed in their most extravagant dimensions in a being no bigger and no better than himself.
William Hazlitt
#Man

William Hazlitt
We grow tired of ourselves, much more of other people. Use may in part reconcile us to our own tediousness, but we do not adopt that of others on the same paternal principle. We may be willing to sell a story twice, never to hear one more than once.
William Hazlitt
#People

William Hazlitt
Our notions with respect to the importance of life, and our attachment to it, depend on a principle which has very little to do with its happiness or its misery. . . . The love of life is, in general, the effect not of our enjoyments, but of our passions.
William Hazlitt
#Life

William Hazlitt
If we use no ceremony toward others, we shall be treated without any. People are soon tired of paying trifling attentions to those who receive them with coldness, and return them with neglect.
William Hazlitt
#People

William Hazlitt
He who comes up to his own idea of greatness must always have had a very low standard of it in mind
William Hazlitt
#Greatness

William Hazlitt
Persons without education certainly do not want either acuteness or strength of mind in what concerns themselves, or in things immediately within their observation; but they have no power of abstraction, no general standard of taste, or scale of opinion. They see their objects always near, and never in the horizon. Hence arises that egotism which has been remarked as the characteristic of self-taught men.
William Hazlitt
#Education

William Hazlitt
Learning is, in too many cases, but a foil to common sense; a substitute for true knowledge. Books are less often made use of as ''spectacles'' to look at nature with, than as blinds to keep out its strong light and shifting scenery from weak eyes and indolent dispositions. The learned are mere literary drudges.
William Hazlitt
#Learning #Books And Reading

William Hazlitt
Ignorance alone makes monsters or bug-bears; our actual acquaintances are all very common-place people.
William Hazlitt
#Ignorance

William Hazlitt
Anyone who has passed through the regular gradations of a classical education, and is not made a fool by it, may consider himself as having had a very narrow escape.
William Hazlitt
#Education