53 Total Quotes

Stephen Stanley Quotes

Today's report should convince most market participants that the March softness in the data was primarily a one-month phenomenon. Sounds like a recipe for continued 25 basis-point rate hikes for the foreseeable future.
Stephen Stanley
#Convince

I do not expect to see the Fed let its guard down on inflation any time soon even though the worst fears of energy pass-through have not come to pass.
Stephen Stanley
#Inflation

The economy is clearly strong right now, and that's what these numbers reflect. In the short term, there's a risk people will pull back on spending, but that depends on how long gas prices stay high, and so far there's not much evidence the consumer is slowing down.
Stephen Stanley
#Economy

The indicators of prices ... are beginning to point more clearly toward inflation pressures.
Stephen Stanley
#Beginning

The market seems to be betting that the storm won't have a long-term impact, but that really depends on how much the storm disrupts the oil infrastructure, something we may not know for weeks.
Stephen Stanley
#Betting

However, we are reaching a point on the calendar when the data should be settling down and there is no indication that the number of new filers is poised to move back to the 310,000 to 340,000 range that prevailed in 2005 prior to the hurricanes.
Stephen Stanley
#Calendar

Fed officials have made clear that their heightened inflation concerns are related more to the outlook than the present situation. Thus, inflation fears have intensified even as core measures of prices have been exceedingly well behaved.
Stephen Stanley
#Inflation

The report follows the recent pattern of strong growth and no inflation.
Stephen Stanley
#Growth

January auto sales were clearly much better than expected. We are on a pace to see a month-to-month increase in the seasonally adjusted sales pace, perhaps to around 17.7 million units or so.
Stephen Stanley
#Sales

We expect productivity growth to moderate, and compensation gains and unit labor costs to pick up. Just another piece of the puzzle that points toward more Fed tightening than the market currently expects.
Stephen Stanley
#Growth

The labor market is very healthy, with both jobs and wages advancing at a nice clip. This means that households will have plenty of cash to support consumption in 2006.
Stephen Stanley
#Jobs

We have been quite skeptical throughout January because data tend to be erratic around the holidays and the turn of the year.
Stephen Stanley
#Holidays

When both exports and imports are surging, that is generally a sign that the economy is in very good shape. These figures strike me as yet another sign that activity entering 2006 was on a solid footing, not about to slow down substantially, as the consensus believes.
Stephen Stanley
#Economy

Ironically, with all this strength, the net effect of these data on the fourth-quarter GDP number could be flat or possibly even marginally negative. This is because durable goods inventories were flat, which should more or less offset the positive influence of the stronger-than-anticipated December shipments figures. For first quarter GDP, however, these data are unambiguously positive.
Stephen Stanley
#Strength

The labor market appears solid heading into 2006, which could have bolstered the confidence reading in January.
Stephen Stanley
#Confidence

The factory sector appears to have begun the year on a solid note, no doubt bolstered by the surge in new orders seen at the end of last year.
Stephen Stanley
#Doubt

We are seeing some improvement in foreign economies, but the imports are just so much bigger than exports you would have to have a big slowdown in U.S. demand to really make a difference. I don't expect to see any big improvement in the near term.
Stephen Stanley
#Improvement

Some of the strength in building permits and claims may be weather-related and so this number probably won't be repeated, but there's been a strong recovery in the index since the hurricanes and by and large we're seeing that in the economy as a whole.
Stephen Stanley
#Strength

The economy retains ample momentum early in 2006.
Stephen Stanley
#Economy

The economy is still growing at an above trend pace and with slack in labor and product markets all but fully absorbed, inflation pressures will begin to gradually build this year.
Stephen Stanley
#Economy

The economy has a lot of momentum. The consumer continues to do well because of the improving labor market, and businesses have a lot of cash and are getting more confident about deploying it.
Stephen Stanley
#Economy

The Fed can not be comfortable with the pace at which the labor market is moving to/through full employment. Let the wage acceleration begin!
Stephen Stanley
#Labor

If the economy keeps growing at a faster pace, the Fed may need to boost rates for longer than what markets are currently expecting. I think that's what the stock and bond markets are reacting to right now.
Stephen Stanley
#Economy

If inflation doesn't accelerate much from here, and the Fed just raises rates a little more, we might see something like the end of the 1990s again. But if the Fed has to really ramp up to fight inflation, it's going to be a much worse environment than investors realize.
Stephen Stanley
#Inflation

We've had this pattern of strong month, weak month lately. May numbers were weaker and the expectation is for June numbers to be stronger.
Stephen Stanley
#Expectation

In terms of monetary policy right now, most people expect the Fed to tighten during the next two or three meetings, but it's foggy beyond that. Greenspan didn't really say much to clarify, either in his comments or in the question period. He was appropriately non-committal, and so there's been little reaction from stocks.
Stephen Stanley
#People

The jobs numbers were definitely on the soft side, and so stocks are down.
Stephen Stanley
#Jobs

This report is huge in the big picture, ... With the election over and this good news on jobs we could at last see an unleashing of animal spirits in the economy.
Stephen Stanley
#Jobs

I think the next really big number for the market is next Friday's retail sales figures. Up until Friday, investors are going to be focused on oil prices, the earnings, and to an extent, the election.
Stephen Stanley
#Sales

A lot of people were hoping June was a fluke and that employment would bounce back, but two in a row is pretty tough to write off. I think market investors are now more worried about the corporate and economic outlook.
Stephen Stanley
#People