33 Total Quotes

John Wilmot Quotes

He never said a foolish thing nor never did a wise one
John Wilmot Permalink
#Fools And Foolishness

There's not a thing on earth that I can name,So foolish, and so false, as common fame.
John Wilmot Permalink
#Earth

Before I married, I had three theories about raising children and no children. Now, I have three children and no theories.
John Wilmot Permalink
#English Writer #Children

...Natural freedoms are but just:There's something generous in mere lust. (A Ramble in St James Park)
John Wilmot Permalink
#Lust

I'd go to him for money for a parade and he'd give me an envelope. This town is a small town, so everybody knew him.
John Wilmot Permalink
#Money

Ancient person, for whom IAll the flattering youth defy,Long be it ere thou grow old,Aching, shaking, crazy, cold;But still continue as thou art,Ancient person of my heart.
John Wilmot Permalink
#Youth

For all men would be cowards if they durst
John Wilmot Permalink
#Men

Natural freedoms are but just:There's something generous in mere lust.
John Wilmot Permalink
#Lust

Man differs more from Man, than Man from Beast.
John Wilmot Permalink
#English Writer #Man

And ever since the Conquest have been fools.
John Wilmot Permalink
#Conquest

E'en her fair hand, which might bid heat return To Frozen age, and make old hermits burn, Applied to my dead cinder, warms no more Than fire to ashes, could past flames restore
John Wilmot Permalink
#Age And Aging

...Natural freedoms are but just: There's something generous in mere lust. (A Ramble in St James Park)
John Wilmot Permalink
#Freedom Of Speech

The clog of all pleasure, the luggage of life, Is the best can be said for a very good wife.
John Wilmot Permalink
#Wives

There's not a thing on earth that I can name, So foolish, and so false, as common fame.
John Wilmot Permalink
#Fame #Earth

Natural freedoms are but just: There's something generous in mere lust.
John Wilmot Permalink
#Freedom Of Speech

Most Men are Cowards, all Men should be Knaves. The Difference lies, as far as I can see, Not in the thing it self, but the degree. . . .
John Wilmot Permalink
#Coward And Cowardice

Angels listen when she speaks: She 's my delight, all mankind's wonder; But my jealous heart would break Should we live one day asunder.
John Wilmot Permalink
#Angels #Mankind

For all men would be cowards if they durst.
John Wilmot Permalink
#English Writer

Before I got married I had six theories about bringing up children; now I have six children, and no theories.
John Wilmot Permalink
#English Writer

All my past life is mine no more, The flying hours are gone, Like transitory dreams given o'er, Whose images are kept in store By memory alone. Whatever is to come is not; How can it then be mine? The present moment's all my lot; And that, as fast as it is got, Phyllis, is wholly thine. Then talk not of inconstancy, False hearts, and broken vows; If I, by miracle, can be This live-long minute true to thee, 'Tis all that heaven allows.
John Wilmot Permalink
#Love

All my past life is mine no more, The flying hours are gone, Like transitory dreams given o'er, Whose images are kept in store By memory alone. Whatever is to come is not; How can it then be mine? The present moment's all my lot; And that, as fast as it is got, Phyllis, is wholly thine. Then talk not of inconstancy, False hearts, and broken vows; If I, by miracle, can be This live-long minute true to thee, 'Tis all that heaven allows.
John Wilmot Permalink
#Love

All my past life is mine no more, The flying hours are gone, Like transitory dreams giv'n o'er, Whose images are kept in store By memory alone. The time that is to come is not; How can it then be mine? The present moment's all my lot; And that, as fast as it is got, Phyllis, is only thine. Then talk not of inconstancy, False hearts, and broken vows; If I, by miracle, can be This live-long minute true to thee, 'Tis all that Heav'n allows.
John Wilmot Permalink
#Love #Poems about Life

All my past life is mine no more, The flying hours are gone, Like transitory dreams given o'er, Whose images are kept in store By memory alone. What ever is to come is not, How can it then be mine? The present moment's all my lot, And that as fast as it is got, Phyllis, is wholly thine. Then talk not of inconstancy, False hearts, and broken vows, Ii, by miracle, can be, This live-long minute true to thee, 'Tis all that heaven allows.
John Wilmot Permalink
#Poems about Life #Popular

Love bade me hope, and I obeyed; Phyllis continued still unkind: Then you may e'en despair, he said, In vain I strive to change her mind. Honour's got in, and keeps her heart, Durst he but venture once abroad, In my own right I'd take your part, And show myself the mightier God. This huffing Honour domineers In breasts alone where he has place: But if true generous Love appears, The hector dares not show his face. Let me still languish and complain, Be most unhumanly denied: I have some pleasure in my pain, She can have none with all her pride. I fall a sacrifice to Love, She lives a wretch for Honour's sake; Whose tyrant does most cruel prove, The difference is not hard to make. Consider real Honour then, You'll find hers cannot be the same; 'Tis noble confidence in men, In women, mean, mistrustful shame.
John Wilmot Permalink
#Poems about Women