9 Total Quotes

Andrew Mack Quotes

What is actually the case is that we've seen this extraordinary improvement across the board in nearly all forms of political violence, except international terrorism, which doesn't kill a lot of people. And yet most people believe things are getting worse.
Andrew Mack
#Improvement

We think the United Nations, despite the many failures, has done in many ways an extraordinary job ... very often with inadequate resources, inappropriate mandates, and with horrible politics in the council, ... If the politics were less horrible, the resources more adequate ... the U.N. could do a much better job.
Andrew Mack
#Nations

We no longer have huge wars with huge armies, major engagements, heavy conventional weapons.
Andrew Mack
#Weapons

We no longer have huge wars with huge armies, major engagements, heavy conventional weapons, most of today's wars are low-intensity wars fought with light weapons, small arms, often in very poor countries, they are extremely brutal but they don't kill that many people.
Andrew Mack
#Weapons

Among the myths we look at and explode are the idea that international terrorism is the greatest threat to global security. In face, international terrorism kills only a tiny number of people each year compared to the number killed in wars.
Andrew Mack
#Myths

Until the 1990s, the international community did little to stop wars. Now it does lots.
Andrew Mack
#Community

As is often the case with criminal violence, there is a huge disjuncture between what people believe is the case and what is actually the case,
Andrew Mack
#People

For many people in the U.N., the 1990s was the worst decade the organization experienced. This was the decade of Somalia, Srebrenica, of Rwanda and so forth, and yet the reality is, during this period, although there were these awful conflicts, the overall number of wars had gone down.
Andrew Mack
#People

People say to us, look, it may well be the case that there are fewer wars and fewer genocides, but surely more people are being killed. But when we look at this, the number of people killed in wars involving a state every year, all the wars, and you can see there's a high point, that's the Korean war, and it keeps on going down and down and down. If you look at the average number of people killed per conflict per year, it goes from 37-thousand in 1950 to just 600 in 2002.
Andrew Mack
#People